Tag Archives: supernovae

Measuring the supernova rate in the early Universe by using galaxy clusters as gravitational telescopes

Supernovae are very rare phenomena in the Universe and their transient nature made them difficult to find for a long time. So, it is not surprising that the discovery rate was around two supernovae per month 30 years ago. Today, we are able to find supernovae daily. For example, the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, in which our group at the Oskar Klein Centre is involved, has discovered almost 3000 supernovae in the last few years. However, these supernovae are all relatively nearby, since the survey is not sensitive … Continue Reading ››

A shocked neighbor?!

Discovering exploding stars, supernovae, within hours from explosion opens new windows to study their nature. Last year, our group at the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) was involved in the study of the closest SNIa explosion in several decades, SN2014J. We have now a new exciting result - an early glimpse of ultraviolet light from a Type Ia supernova, iPTF14atg, reveals what appears to be a shocked neighboring star. The results published in the journal Nature uncover the nature of the kind of objects that are used as standard … Continue Reading ››

A close look a the nearest standard candle supernova in several decades

Supernova 2014J in the nearby galaxy M82 -less than 12 million light-years away- exploded on January 14, 2014 and was the closest ”standard candle” supernova since (at least) 42 years. An impressive coordinated observational effort orchestrated by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) team and led by Ariel Goobar from the Oskar Klein Centre at Stockholm University (Goobar et al. 2014, The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 784, L12) provides important new clues into the nature of these explosions, as well as the environments where they take place. The … Continue Reading ››

Hubble Space Telescope images of a supernova in nearby galaxy M82

A new bright supernova exploded in the nearby galaxy M82 on January 14 this year, at a distance of approximately 11.5 million light–years from Earth, that makes it to the nearest "normal" Type Ia supernova discovered in the past 42 years. Its small distance together with the fact that the first observations were carried out only a few hours after the explosion, makes it in itself a very important astronomical object, since it allows to study the details of many aspects of these kind of objects that are so important … Continue Reading ››

Large grant for supernova research at OKC with the iPTF

It is the Knut och Alice Wallenbergs foundation that grants a 5-year long project for finding and studying supernovae. The OKC are already since the beginning of this year members of the intermediate Palomar
Transient Factory (iPTF) – a supernova search aimed at finding supernovae soon after explosion. This is a pathfinder for the next generation of this project – the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF). The 30 million grant from KAW will now enable OKC astronomers and physicists to play a leading role in that project.

The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory

In February this year the iPTF (intermediate Palomar Transient Factory) program was started.
This is a survey searching for optical transients using a robotic 1.2 meter telescope in California, and the Oskar Klein Centre is one of the participating institutes for the next 2 years. The aim is to discover transients – in particular supernovae – at an earlier stage than hitherto possible, hopefully within hours after the explosion. The concrete scientific question we want to address is the nature of the progenitor systems of supernovae, and this requires very early observations of these explosions, before the memory of the initial configuration gets lost.

Nobel Prize in Physics to Supernova Cosmology

The Royal Swedish Academy of Science announced today the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2011, something that made us at the Oskar Klein Centre very proud indeed. The Prize goes to the two teams who discovered the present acceleration of the universe using supernovae as standard candles: the Supernovae Cosmology Project, in the person of Saul Perlmutter, and The High-z Supernova Search Team in the persons of Adam G. Riess and Brian P. Schmidt.