Tag Archives: Fermi

Hunting light dark matter with gamma rays

Physicists around the globe are working relentlessly to pin down the nature of dark matter. This enigmatic entity hides itself from our view as it does neither emit nor absorb any radiation. It only reveals itself through its gravitational interaction. With a new analysis of data from NASA’s gamma-ray large area telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi satellite, we have now come closer to test very light dark matter candidates. Many regard the astrophysical evidence for dark matter as evidence for yet undiscovered fundamental particles. Well-motivated theories suggest that these particles … Continue Reading ››

GRB 130427A: a chance not to miss

On 27 April, an incredible opportunity was given to GRB science detectives. As the spring was outbursting here in Stockholm the explosion of a distant star almost blinded the Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detectors on board the Fermi satellite. GRB130427 is the brightest GRB ever detected in the keV – MeV band and the longest lasting in the GeV energy range: Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) could detect it for hours after the trigger.

Fermi observations proves Supernova Remnants produce Cosmic Rays

Particles with TeV energies, like those produced at the LHC, seem exotic. But once outside the protection of our atmosphere, these “cosmic rays” (CR) become exceedingly common. The Fermi Telescope, for example, encounters a hundred thousand CR for every gamma ray it detects. These particles have an impressive scope of local effects, from damaging electronics and inhibiting manned space travel to possibly triggering lightning strikes. And although we have been aware of their existence since the early 1900ʼs, their exact origins remained unclear.