Tag Archives: astronomy

Interview with Emily Freeland

Emily Freeland is one of the OKC fellows that joined the Oskar Klein Center after the summer. I asked her to tell us a bit about her research to get to know her better.
What is your field of research?
The main theme that runs through the majority of my research is an exploration of the role that environment plays in galaxy evolution. The universe has a filamentary structure and these filaments are populated by individual galaxies and groups of galaxies.

Interview with Lucia Guaita

Lucia Guaita is one of the Oskar Klein Centre postdocs, working at the astronomy department here in Stockholm. She started as postdoc at OKC about one year ago, on November 2010, and is working on high-redshift star forming galaxies. Let’s get to know her better.
Why did you choose the okc for doing your postdoc?

This is my first post doc. I chose to apply to this position because the topic would have been very close to what I was doing during my PhD. It seemed quite a nice continuation of my PhD thesis work and it is.

What is your field of research?

I am working on star forming galaxies at high redshift.

The end for supermassive population III stars?

Are the first stars really very massive? Some 10 years ago, the idea that the first, metal-free stars would be very massive, became popular. Simple theoretical arguments about radiative cooling and complex numerical simulations both seemed to point to the formation of metal-free stars of masses of several 100s solar masses. Because of their zero metallicity they were dubbed Pop III stars. Early simulations of their formation are commonly associated with Tom Abel and Volker Bromm.

Herschel finds enormous stores of dust in supernova 1987A

Supernova (SN) 1987A continues to surprise us. It exploded in February 1987 as a blue supergiant, not a red one, and it later displayed three circumstellar rings whose origin are still not completely understood. The latest finding is that between 160,000 and 230,000 Earth masses of dust may have been created since the explosion in 1987. It has been known from other core-collapse supernovae that they can produce of order 100 Earth masses of dust, but that another factor of 1000 was possible came as a complete surprise.

Observing supernovae with the Gran Telescopio Canarias

We are just about to finish our second night at the world’s largest optical telescope, the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) on the summit of the island of La Palma. For me personally, observing surely confirms that the only difference between children and scientists are the prices of their toys. The pricetag of the GTC is roughly 650000 times more than the telescope I got in the 8th grade, but on the other hand it also has about 10000 times light collecting capability.