The Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 for Neutrino Oscillations

The announcement of the Nobel Prize in Physics awarded to Takaaki Kajita (Univ. of Tokyo) and Arthur McDonald (Queen’s University, Canada) for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, and thus the revelation that neutrinos have mass, is an exciting occasion for its recognition of fundamental scientific research of the kind done by all of us at the Oskar Klein Centre.

Cosmic transients around the clock!

What do you do when you are studying an exciting transient optical phenomenon and the Sun rises, rendering further observations impossible from your observatory? Well, there is always dark sky somewhere else!

A project dubbed Global Relay of Observatories Watching Transients Happen (GROWTH), a collaboration among twelve institutions spread around the globe including OKC, has been awarded a $4.5 million over five years from NSF to perform coordinated follow-up studies of optical transients

Passerby become Supernova hunters in Kungsträdgården

Fysik i Kungsträdgården is one of the major outreach events in Stockholm where scientists have the chance to show their research (read more about the whole event in Fysikum blog). This year the supernova group at the OKC invited the public to look for supernovae with us using the intermediate Palomar (Transient) Factory (iPTF) collaboration telescope in Palomar, California, U.S.A (read more about the iPTF). Due to the time difference between Stockholm and California, we were able to look at live images as they were … Continue Reading ››

The young star cluster perspective of star formation

Star formation is one of the fundamental process contributing to galaxy evolution and therefore in shaping the Universe. Yet it is extremely challenging to build a complete view of this process and its interplay with galactic scale properties. The most challenging aspect is to reconcile physical mechanisms, which operate at the smallest spatial scales (i.e. the size of our solar system) all the way up to galactic scale features such as the large star-forming complexes.

A shocked neighbor?!

Discovering exploding stars, supernovae, within hours from explosion opens new windows to study their nature. Last year, our group at the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) was involved in the study of the closest SNIa explosion in several decades, SN2014J. We have now a new exciting result - an early glimpse of ultraviolet light from a Type Ia supernova, iPTF14atg, reveals what appears to be a shocked neighboring star. The results published in the journal Nature uncover the nature of the kind of objects that are used as standard … Continue Reading ››

Dark matter at the heart of the Galaxy

A new study is providing evidence for the presence of dark matter in the innermost part of the Milky Way, including in our own cosmic neighbourhood and the Earth’s location. The study demonstrates that large amounts of dark matter exist around us, and also between us and the Galactic centre. The result constitutes a fundamental step forward in the quest for the nature of dark matter.

Still no Dark Matter in the latest analysis of LHC data…

Last night the ATLAS Collaboration released its latest search for dark matter and other beyond the standard model theories [1] based on the full dataset from the LHC Run I (2010-2012). By looking for proton-proton collisions where jets of hadronic particles are produced only in one direction (Figure 1), violating conservation of momentum only in appearance, we use ATLAS to search for  weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), such as dark matter particles. Because they are weakly interacting, the WIMPs escape ATLAS undetected and lead to what looks like missing momentum. Continue Reading ››

2014: another great year for the Oskar Klein Centre

After six very successful years of OKC leadership, Lars Bergström was asked to become the new Dean of the Mathematics and Physics Section of the Science Faculty of Stockholm University. As a consequence, he has stepped down as OKC director and  a new position at the Department of Physics at Stockholm University has been announced to find a replacement. In the mean time, I will serve as director of the centre. It is with a sense of great pride – and a fair bit of apprehension -  that … Continue Reading ››